Ali Smith

Ali Smith

1976
.
Ali Smith (born 1976, Newport Beach, CA) received her MFA from California State University, Long Beach (CA), and has exhibited widely throughout the United States, with recent solo shows in New York at Freight and Volume Gallery, as well as in Houston and Los Angeles. She has just completed 12 new large-scale canvases for her upcoming solo show at Mark Moore Gallery in Culver City, opening February 25th.
.
Smith’s energetic canvases meld delicate line with impasto paint, forging a fine balance between intention and intuition. With her emblematic vibrant palette, she manipulates jarring angles, soft curves and intricate nooks to unearth abstract terrains and surreal forms. Smith constructs elaborate micro and macrocosms through a delicate balance of chance and intention- simulating the complex balance found in organic structures. Often drawing from studies on paper and collages to create her large-scale compositions, Smith has continued to evolve her idiosyncratic, highly personal language of motifs and forms that are at once fluid and open.
.
Her work is included in the collections of the Laguna Art Museum (CA), Frederick R. Weisman Foundation (CA), Progressive (OH) and the Chaney Family Collection (TX). Smith lives and works in Long Beach, CA.
.

In a shortened career of twenty-five years, with a focused dedication to artistic integrity, Richard Bunkall created a significant body of work that was both original and emotionally compelling. His early work expressed simpler themes; themes that he later developed into spiritual and iconic masterpieces. He was able to tell the story of humanity and its vulnerability through his art. He embraced and glorified the creations of man and ensconced them in monuments of his own making; adeptly portraying man’s desire to create something more permanent than himself.

Recognized by his peers and acclaimed by the critical establishment, he was honored with Individual Painting Grants from the National Endowment for the Arts twice within five years. Bunkall was also a revered teacher at the prominent academic institution Art Center College of Design. He enjoyed sharing his knowledge and love of art, and was rewarded with respect and admiration from students, fellow instructors and administrators.

In 1994, Richard Bunkall was diagnosed with ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. He met this challenge with the same humor, strength and dignity he had maintained throughout his life. In his last year, while his physical strength diminished, his passion for painting did not. He was able to produce and work until nearly the end of his life. But perhaps it could be said that Richard Bunkall’s greatest achievement was the impact he made on all who knew him – shaping their lives as they watched the way he was finishing his.

– See more at: http://www.richardbunkall.com/artist.asp#sthash.f6SxV0lA.dpuf

In a shortened career of twenty-five years, with a focused dedication to artistic integrity, Richard Bunkall created a significant body of work that was both original and emotionally compelling. His early work expressed simpler themes; themes that he later developed into spiritual and iconic masterpieces. He was able to tell the story of humanity and its vulnerability through his art. He embraced and glorified the creations of man and ensconced them in monuments of his own making; adeptly portraying man’s desire to create something more permanent than himself.

Recognized by his peers and acclaimed by the critical establishment, he was honored with Individual Painting Grants from the National Endowment for the Arts twice within five years. Bunkall was also a revered teacher at the prominent academic institution Art Center College of Design. He enjoyed sharing his knowledge and love of art, and was rewarded with respect and admiration from students, fellow instructors and administrators.

In 1994, Richard Bunkall was diagnosed with ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. He met this challenge with the same humor, strength and dignity he had maintained throughout his life. In his last year, while his physical strength diminished, his passion for painting did not. He was able to produce and work until nearly the end of his life. But perhaps it could be said that Richard Bunkall’s greatest achievement was the impact he made on all who knew him – shaping their lives as they watched the way he was finishing his.

– See more at: http://www.richardbunkall.com/artist.asp#sthash.f6SxV0lA.dpuf

Green Spleen
Oil on canvas, 2008
50 x 70 inches
Museum purchase with funds from the Mark and Hilarie Moore Family Trust
2009.002