Laguna Art Museum Announces ex·pose, a New Contemporary Art Program

.

.
Laguna Art Museum is excited to announce ex•pose, new contemporary art program curated by Grace Kook-Anderson. Ms. Kook-Anderson is the curator of exhibitions at Laguna Art Museum and specializes in contemporary art. ex•pose will feature rotating contemporary art exhibitions, focusing on one emerging artist or mid-career artist at a time. Instead of a dedicated space at the museum, each exhibition will be dependent on each artist’s project. The program aims to work with a diverse range of artists working in all mediums, rooted in a conceptual foundation. This program will kick-off in summer 2012, and each ex•pose exhibition will focus on encouraging artists to take the opportunity to create new work.
.
Previous examples of similar exhibitions at Laguna Art Museum include: Jeremy Fish: Weathering the Storm (fall 2009); Sean Duffy: Searcher (fall 2010); Brad Coleman: Reproductions (spring 2011); and Lita Albuquerque: Emergence (summer 2011). These exhibitions can be seen as a case study to create a platform for a rotating contemporary art project at Laguna Art Museum.
.
ex•pose: Peter Bo Rappmund
June 10-October 7, 2012

Based in Laguna Beach, Peter Bo Rappmund is a recent graduate at California Institute of the Arts (2010). Working mainly in film, video, and sound, Bo Rappmund will be showing two recent works and a new project that will be exhibited for the first time.
.
Bo Rappmund’s working process is a lengthy one, recording natural and rhythmic changes in the landscape, often covering much geographical ground. In Psychohydrography (2010), Bo Rappmund films the flow of water from the Sierra Mountains down to the Los Angeles Aqueduct, ending in the Pacific Ocean. The time-lapse film follows our water source in a way that many viewers do not have the opportunity to know first-hand, creating an experiential trajectory.
.
ex•pose: Macha Suzuki
November 4, 2012-January 27, 2013

Macha Suzuki’s installations convey a sense of narrative that is strangely familiar, highly attractive, yet also dark and disruptive. Suzuki’s installations blend the dualities of representation and abstract forms. Figurative elements are suspended in a place of fantasy with bright colors and glossy surfaces. Suzuki’s sculptures are highly crafted, using a mixture of materials that may include epoxy clay, fluorescent lights, plastic, and Bondo.
.
In Permission to Fail (2010), the word “fail” never looked more inviting and hopeful. The word is portrayed in bright pink, appearing to have formed by the construction of branches, surrounded by green leaves, like newly sprouted foliage, perhaps implying growth as a result of learned failures.
.
ex•pose: Allison Schulnik
February-May, 2013

Allison Schulnik’s paintings, sculptures, and clay-animations are all thickly depicted, using expressionistic, surreal forms. Bright colors emerge through an overall dark palette, and as in her clay-animation, Schulnik’s paintings take on a sense of an ever-morphing figure.
.
Schulnik’s figures of hobos, clowns, and creatures intertwine into part of the environment, and each other, forming moments of abstraction, and then a semblance of representation again. Influenced by artists like James Ensor (1860-1949), Schulnik continues in the vein of surreal imagery that is equally haunting, mournful, and beautiful all at once.

Speak Your Mind

*