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Activity

Fake News

A writing and drawing activity exploring the relationship between news and reality.

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Docent Introduction
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Inspiration

Cynical

In Cynical, Nicholas Brigante depicts a woman reading a newspaper. The title suggests that she might not trust the stories that she is reading.

These days we often hear the phrase “fake news.” It is used by political leaders, comedians, and even at our own family dinner tables. The confusing part is that it is often used when referring to news that is very real. And real news can at times seem unbelievable, like right now!

Nicholas Brigante, Cynical, 1933
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Instructions
David Shrigley, News: It Won’t Be Like This Forever, 2018

Make It Your Own

  • Create a newspaper headline and a corresponding drawing that is either entirely fake, has elements of truth, or is entirely true, but unbelievable.
  • Be playful and use your imagination.
  • Here is an example of a work inspired by newspaper headlines. It is by the British artist David Shrigley.
  • Share your work with us on Instagram with the additional tags #FakeNews #LAMLabAtHome
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Share

Show Us Your Work